Saturday, November 13, 2021

20 Rep Squat Routine - Paul Carter (2017)



Paul Carter on Twitter


Maximum Muscle Bible


Week by Week "highlights" of the Rittenhouse Trial at link below. There's really no case here, but plenty of opportunity for the prosecution and its witnesses to stick both feet in their mouths. Over and over, day after day, failing to make a case in any potent way: 

Week One:
Week Two:








There are so many ways to set up a 20 rep squat layout . . . 
so many variations available! 




Work out three times a week. 
Monday/Wednesday/Friday.
Alternate Workout One and Workout Two. 
So, Week one = Workout One/Two/One
Week two = Workout Two/One/Two

Workout One

 - Bench Press: 
3-4 warmup sets, then 3 sets of 8 reps.

  - Squat: 
3-4 warmup sets, then 1 set of 20.

 - Chest-Supported Row: 
2-3 warmup sets, then 3 x 12.

 - Curl: 
2 warmup sets, then 2 x 12.


Workout Two

 - Incline Press:
3-4 warmup sets, then the 3/50 method. That's 3 sets with the same weight, shooting for about 50 total reps over those three sets. A proper weight selection would have you hitting around 18-22 reps on the first set. Once you're able to get a total of 50 reps over 3 sets, add weight. An example for a strong lifter might look like this: 

225 x 22
225 x 13
225 x 8
Total reps = 43 (close enough. Stick with that weight until you can get 50).

 - Squat: 
3-4 warmup sets, then 1 x 20 reps.

Chinup: 
50 total reps in as few sets as possible. If you can't do a lot of chinups, then get stronger. 

Dip: 5 x 10 reps, using additional weight if needed. 


Details 

On the first week of squatting, don't go in and kill yourself. If you do that the first session, you're probably going to be too sore to walk for a few days, much less squat again two days later. Each session, add a little weight to the squat. By the second week you should be accustomed enough to them that you can really start adding on weight and upping the intensity. If you do this right, you should hit a 20-rep PR your last week. 

For all the other exercises, use progressive overload. Try to add weight and/or reps where you can. If you start light, and get a run-and-go in your planning, you should hit some PRs over the coming weeks in most of the movements.

Don't start too heavy or get too crazy with your effort the first week. Think about each week building on progression for the upcoming week. This is smart and effective programming.

You should also be really tired of doing 20-rep squats at that point after 6 weeks, and you'll be ready for a deload or a week off completely.

Don't use this program while in a hypocaloric state, i.e., dieting. This is for the guy that really waants to build mass and push past plateaus. And those can't happen without a surplus of food to accomodate this training. 


Go to the Edge, But Don't Fall Over It

Don't do this program for more than 6 weeks without stopping to assess where you are phyically and mentally. Squatting three times a week is rough. Do that for too long and you're going to end up with some overuse issues. Also, squatting for 20 reps will eventually take a toll on you mentally and you'll find it harder to be up for a truly significant training session. 

Be in tune with how you feel mentally each workout and each week. I call it the difference between being hungry and being full. When you get full, you don't want to eat another bit. Well, you can get full on training too. And that's defined by having thoughts of "I really don't want to be in here today."

That happens to all of us, and is not a loser's mentality, despite all the "hardcore" memes you see on the internet. I'm talking about guys and gals who are regulars, and not people who haven't established training as habit or found their love for it yet. 

















 

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