Friday, July 9, 2010

The Bench Press: Breakthroughs in Biomechanics and Training Methods - Thomas M. McLaughlin





The Bench Press: Breakthroughs in Biomechanics and Training Methods
by Thomas M. McLaughlin, Ph.D. (1984)


Contents

Chapter One: What’s So Interesting About the Bench Press
1.1 – A brief history of the bench press.
1.2 – Its widespread popularity.
1.3 – Current world records.
1.4 – Research on the bench press to date.
1.5 – The purpose of this book.
1.6 – How to use this book to increase your bench press.

Chapter Two: Biomechanics of the Bench Press
2.1 – The rules of bench pressing.
2.2 – Typical bar velocity and acceleration patterns.
2.3 – The degree of control used in lowering the bar.
2.4 – Forces exerted on the bar in the bench press.
2.5 – The sticking point.
2.6 – Horizontal position of the bar path relative to shoulders.
2.7 – The sequence of bar movements used in raising the bar.
2.8 – Grip spacing.
2.9 – Angling of the arms.
2.10 – Torques about the shoulder.
2.11 – Changes over time in top bench pressers.
2.12 – The “pause” in competition.
2.13 – Arching/bridging/bouncing.
2.14 – Hand/finger orientation in holding the bar.
2.15 – Symmetrical loading of the bar.
2.16 – What if you miss?
2.17 – Power output.
2.18 – Relationship of bench press capacity to bodyweight.
2.19 – Importance of chest size.

Chapter Three: Developing the Key Muscles Used in Benching
3.1 – What we know about muscle involvement in the bench.
3.2 – Training the chest.
3.3. – Training the triceps.
3.4 – Training the shoulders.
3.5 – Training associated muscles.

Chapter Four: Training Ideas for Developing a Bigger Bench
4.1 – General philosophy.
4.2 – Optimal training for key bench press muscles.
4.3 – Technique training for the bench.
4.4 – The “total” bench press training program.

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