Monday, September 3, 2012

Deficit Deadlift Cycle - Ed Coan









Explanation of Deficit Deadlift
by Doug Daniels


It is in reality no more than a deadlift done from a slightly elevated position. This slight elevation can make all the difference in the world. The elevation makes the lifter pull from a deeper starting position, overloading that part of the lift. This added distance changes the lift just enough to develop your pulling musculature over a greater range of motion. The main beneficiary is the start of your pull, but the midrange and lockout is also beneficial. If you can improve your pull off the floor, even if that part of the lift is your forte, the bar should progress to lockout with greater power and velocity, thus breaking through any sticking point later in the lift. It is like pushing a car. It may be hard to get the car going, but once it starts to roll, keeping it rolling is a piece of cake. We can improve our chances against our mortal enemy, gravity.




Let's begin with a description of this lift. These deadlifts are done while the lifter stands on a sturdy platform such as a wood block or platform, or even on a 100 pound barbell plate. Again, the major requirement is that the platform be sturdy enough to allow balance and support both the weight of the lifter and the weight used. The platform also must not be too high or the bar will hit the top of the lifter's feet when it is fully lowered to the floor. About 3-5 inches is all you need, any more is inviting injury due to a decrease in balance in the lowering phase of the lift. I recommend all deadlifts touch the floor after each rep and no bouncing is done. This will insure better pulling form, power from the floor, and less chance for injury. Perform this lift in the conventional style, that is, hands outside your legs.



Lifters with poor flexibility, especially in the ankles and Achilles tendons, may have trouble getting comfortable and maintaining their balance during the lift. They may tend to lunge forward during the lift and may actually fall forward off the platform, which of course, flexibility a bit before going hard on this move. If you are too big to get a good pull, then you'll have to forgo this one and concentrate on the traditional deadlift off the floor. You will not be able to use as much weight for this deadlift as you normally do with the pull off the floor due to the increased range of movement. To start, I would suggest starting out with 50% of your best deadlift for one rep for 6 reps to get accustomed to the new angle and balance. Go up in weight slowly from there. I don't recommend going lower than 3 reps with this pull due to the higher chance for injury because of the increased range of motion and the unusual pulling position you must assume to start the lift. As with any deadlift, begin the pull with your legs while keeping your back as flat and erect as possible. Keep your arms locked straight during the lift to completion.






 12 Week Deficit Deadlift Cycle
by Ed Coan (1986)

In my opinion, the deadlift is the most important lift in a meet. It is the lifter's last chance to win. That is why I have put a lot of work into it. My cycle for the deadlift is 12 weeks. It consists of 3 weeks of 8 reps, 4 weeks of 5 reps, 4 weeks of 3 reps, and the week before the meet includes just a double at or around your opener. Assistance work is done on Tuesday, because I deadlift on Saturday. It consists of 3 sets of chins with weight for 8 reps, long pulley rows 2 x 8, shrugs 2 x 20 with a knuckles front grip. 

The poundages I have selected for this routine assume the lifter coming into the routine deadlifted 600 pounds in his last meet. Adjust your poundages proportionately. 

I deadlift sumo style, so conventional deadlifts are done after my sumo deadlifts. If you are a conventional deadlifter, just do your first three weeks of the cycle off a 2-inch block. No bouncing

Regardless of whether or not you are using sumo or conventional style there are three steps to remember. After you set up, do these in order:

1.) Drive with the legs.
2.) Pull the weight into your body.
3.) Pull the head up and back while pushing the chest out.


The Routine 

 Week 1:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
425 x 8
390 x 8 - Conventional, off block.

Week 2:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
445 x 8
400 x 8 - Conventional, off block.

Week 3:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
465 x 8
410 x 8 - Conventional, off block.

Week 4:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
490 x 5
435 x 5 - Conventional, off block.

Week 5:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
510 x 5
445 x 5 - Conventional, off block.

Week 6:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
525 x 5
455 x 5 - Conventional, off block.

Week 7:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
535 x 5
465 x 5 - Conventional, off block.

Week 8:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
555 x 3
475 for reps - Conventional, off block.

Week 9:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
570 x 3
485 for reps - Conventional, off block.

Week 10:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
580 x 3
495 for reps - Conventional, off block.

Week 11:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
590 x 3
500 x 3 - Conventional, off block.

Week 12:
135 x 8
240 x 5
340 x 3
600 x 2
No conventional work.

Peak:
584
617
639














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